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7 Games Like Control You Can Play Right Now

Released in 2019 for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Microsoft Windows, Control was met with both commercial success and critical acclaim at the time of its release.

As a matter of fact, many considered it one of the best games released in 2019. This success convinced the developers to release two expansions for the game.

Just two years later, Control is now a free title given away to PlayStation Plus subscribers for February 2021. This gave a lot more gamers a chance to play this unique game on both the PlayStation 4 and the PlayStation 5.

Unfortunately, playing through the game leaves you with a taste of wanting something similar. And, well, there are very few games out there, if any, that play similarly to Remedy Entertainment's weird and trippy action-adventure title.

With that said, we've decided to help out.

Below, we have rounded up 7 of the best games like Control if you're looking for something similar.

1. Alan Wake

Alan Wake is a completely different game from Control that shares enough similarities with the 2019 title to make it worth your while.

Was it ever really a surprise that the first game on our list that's similar to Control is one that comes from Remedy Entertainment themselves?

The similarities between Alan Wake and The Control lie far beyond sharing developers.

For one, the titular Alan Wake is voiced by Mathew Porretta, who, in case you missed it, is the voice actor of Dr. Casper Darling in Control. But the similarities don't just end there. Alan Wake also has the same ever-present supernatural threat vibe going for it, complete with a very peculiar and atmospheric setting.

Not to mention, both titles share the same continuity. In fact, the 2019 title references events and characters from the 2010 cult classic.

Of course, both games are completely different from each other.

Whereas Control teethers more towards psychic super powers and exploring out-of-this-world phenomenon, Alan Wake is more of a psychological horror film that explores the latter's descent into madness.

Either way, both games are well worth playing, Alan Wake more so if you're more of a fan of the older Silent Hill titles.

2. The Sinking City

The Sinking City is more supernatural than paranormal but those who liked Control's atmosphere should feel right at home here.

Ukraine-based company, Frogwares, have built a reputation for their work on the Sherlock Holmes video games. However, Frogwares has proven time and time again that they don't always need to rely on the name of the popular consulting detective to make a good game.

Case in point, The Sinking City.

While the 2019 action-adventure title doesn't have the Sherlock Holmes tag attached to it, it could've very well been one. It sports similar investigation mechanics albeit with a heavier focus on combat. But, what separates it from Frogwares' other titles is how it draws heavy inspiration from the works of H.P. Lovecraft.

Similar to Alan Wake, The Sinking City puts players in the shoes of a man who's seemingly losing his grip on reality.

If that kind of story tickles your fancy, expect to find plenty to like in The Sinking City.

3. Prey

Superpowers, aliens, and the ever-looming presence of death at seemingly every corner, what's not to like?

Speaking of weird and trippy action-adventure titles, Prey has a lot of Control in it. Albeit, instead of the paranormal, you're dealing with alien monstrosities, as well as a secret organization who's up to no good in Arkane Studios' spiritual sequel to the cult classic video game series, System Shock.

With a gripping storyline that's sure to keep you hooked from the start all the way up to the end, Prey is well worth a playthrough.

4. The Evil Within

If you prefer your protagonist more helpless than all-powerful, then The Evil Within might just be right up your alley.

The Evil Within franchise is two games deep with a couple of DLCs released in between both titles.

If you're looking for a more nightmare fuel kind of game instead of one that simply has an eerie atmosphere like Control though, we definitely recommend Shinji Mikami's first return to the survival-horror genre, The Evil Within.

The first title narrows down the setting into somewhere more intimate. However, while the setting is less open than its sequel, it more than makes up for the lack of exploration with more substance. Not to mention, the game is seemingly out to surprise you every chance that it gets by constantly introducing new creepy settings and creatures.

While you do feel a lot more powerless and less in control in The Evil Within, it shares the same atmospheric and immersive feeling with The Control that's just hard to find in other games.

5. BioShock

Similar to Control, the BioShock franchise is a series of games that received critical and commercial acclaim for, among many things, treating its setting as more like live character.

Speaking of atmosphere, is there a game more atmospheric out there than any of the BioShock games?

It doesn't matter which of the BioShock games you end up playing. All games are worth playing through if only for the atmosphere alone.

Whereas in other games, the setting feels more just like a backdrop, in BioShock, it's part of the entire thing.

Whether it's the underwater city of Rapture where the first two BioShock games are set or the city floating in the sky, Columbia, where most of BioShock: Infinite takes place, the dilapidated environments of the BioShock games feel just as live as the Oldest House of Control.

6. Half-Life

If you can stand the graphics, the first Half-Life game is definitely worth playing after you've finished Control.

Easily the oldest game on our list, Half-Life isn't exactly easy on the eyes these days. However, its "show rather than tell" way of telling its story was groundbreaking at the time, as it gave players full control of what was happening around them.

Of course, being in control isn't exactly how we'd describe how you'd feel like playing the game.

Seeing Black Mesa go from a typical research facility to succumbing to a monstrous invasion really helps make the small and intimidate setting stick out in the mind of anyone who has ever played the game.

7. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Knight

This traditional Metroidvania game doesn't share a lot of similarity with Control, but at the same time, should feel very similar for players who liked how the game's progression system worked.

The term "Metroidvania" is typically not used to describe 3D games. However, it's a word that's been frequently associated with Control, and for a good reason.

Control might be a third-person action-adventure title, but exploration is at its very core. You'll encounter numerous obstacles at the start of the game. Most of these, you can only hurdle through later on once you've unlocked more powers.

If you liked that particular aspect of Control, you might like pretty much every other Metroidvania title out there.

Of course, if you were to play a Metroidvania title, why not play one that's more recent?

Produced by Koji Igarashi, who also worked on the classic Metroidvania title, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night is a more traditional Metroidvania experience that, although won't cater to everyone, is worth trying out if you liked all the going back and forth (among other things) in Control.

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Written By

Ray is a freelance content writer based in the Philippines. He is a lifelong gamer and a PC hardware enthusiast. He builds and repairs laptops and computers for friends and family in his spare time. You can find Ray on Twitter.